Pulling it All Together - Entity Abstraction

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Article Index
Pulling it All Together
To Be Modular
Projects Modelled with UII
Text Reports
Aggegation
Entity Abstraction
Appendices
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Entity Abstraction Summary

A common occurrence, particularly with the Buildings entity, is the need of the client/owner to isolate and apportion construction cost to their planned use of parts of a planned building or buildings. Perhaps more properly these differing uses may be termed as functional space, although using that terminology can cause confusion with another approximate estimating technique. Again, the possibilities for such subdivision are endless, and are for the most part determined by the client’s own specific view of those operational cost centres that are important to control within their business investment operation.

In some instances this separation is simple, as some operations/functions will quite clearly be carried out in separate (separated) buildings. In these instances the simple summary approach, detailed above, will suffice. However in the case of mixed use single buildings, the client needs add an additional level of aggregation.

A word of caution – we are not speaking here of the approximate estimating technique that applies unit cost to separate room spaces for example, meeting rooms, washrooms, kitchens, and other room spaces etc. That is a different approach which, while it can be incorporated into an elemental process, it is not the broader use that we are addressing here.

A client’s intent, when requiring this added level of aggregation, is specific to their need for measuring their return on investment in each area, or cost centre. There is little use in spending more money than can reasonably be expected to be returned in the course of their business, or, in the case of funded operations, spending more than those funds permit.

While we address generic options here, the Appendices attached to this paper do include some examples of possible mixed use, high level functional space allocations.

 

Entity – Aggregated Cost Summary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Entity - Name

 

 

 

 

Space Type 1

$

 

 

 

Space Type 2

$

 

 

 

Space Type …

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                    Entity Total

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

Entity Abstraction Analysis

In the very early planning stages it is possible that the decision to combine functional spaces together within single entities will not have been made, although the possibility of doing so may well be known. Consequently it may be prudent to initially cost plan each functional space separately i.e. making the assumption that each occupies its own floor, or wing. Note that this approach is not required for functions that occupy a whole building (remember that with UII every distinct, separate, building is required to be analysed and reported individually).

Estimating each function space (client cost centre) and presenting each in an elemental analysis will create several elemental analyses (as many as there broad function spaces or cost centres) which will be combined (summarised) into one overall elemental analysis. To do this is not a matter of adding the figures from each analysis together into one entity analysis (as can be the case with elemental summaries), but rather that the various estimates must be gathered together at the sub-element level. Familiarity with the elemental analysis report format (see E2514) will quickly indicate why the simple summing of analyses will fail, but the summing of elemental summaries can succeed.

 

Entity – Aggregated Cost Analysis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Entity - Name

 

$

 

 

Includes:

 

 

 

 

Space Type 1

$

 

 

 

Space Type 2

$

 

 

 

Space Type …

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The presentation to a client will likely be just the one elemental analysis or, the one single sum, with the included analyses presented as supporting appendices.

This paper is a draft that may become a proposed ASTM standard if the sub-committee so chooses, although it will require more detailed thought yet before that can satisfactorily  happen.

 

It will be evident to those who have read through the foregoing that the range of approach and possible report format is wide and unique to each project. Whereas with the elemental format, applied  to each specific entity, the format is fixed and is deliberately kept so to maintain a rigorous database for comparison, control and record keeping. The aggregation summaries referred to above may differ, project to project, but of course, once set, they must be maintained consistently for the duration of the project.

 

The Appendices that follow are necessarily only a brief range of possible aggregated and abstracted summaries to aid the readers further understanding.