Pulling it All Together - Aggegation

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Pulling it All Together
To Be Modular
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Aggegation
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Aggegation

Projects will use the prescribed presentation format for each entity. Simple projects may need to use only one - an individual building with related sitework on one site for example. More complex projects may well include several entities, each presented in the prescribed format, with a construction cost grand summary collecting the totals of each entity together.

 

Project cost and descriptive, text, summaries is therefore an aggregation of the various entities required to complete the desired project.

 

Construction Cost Summaries

The structured framework of UII elemental classifications is used in cost summaries and analyses the purpose for which UNIFORMAT II is primarily designed in a variety of ways. These may be for cost planning and cost control, value engineering workshops, and quantitative risk analyses for example. Similar use can be made of the framework in preparing master schedules and structured cost manuals, and also, as noted earlier, for word-based reporting too. These may be Preliminary Project Descriptions, Condition Reports and other text-rich descriptive work.

 Project Cost Summary

Most monetary summaries can be very simple, recording the final total of each entity within the project, or program, contributing to a Grand Total.

By setting budgets and controlling cost at the entity level the simple summary need be no more than a totalling exercise. Analogous to a Table of Contents, used in word-based reports, the summary will record each entity total cost (in lieu of, or perhaps in addition to, a report page number), with the addition of a final Grand Total.

The entities need not be identical forms of construction, either all buildings, or all bridges for example, but will include all those entities included in the project or program. However, for reasons unique to any project/program, like entities can be grouped together with sub-totals of each group included in the Summary.

The possibilities for grouping within a simple summary are endless and may often be unique. Two basic examples follow:

Simple Summary

 

Simple Summary - Grouped

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Entity 1

$

 

 

Group 1

 

 

 

 

Entity 2

$

 

 

          Entity 1-1

$

 

 

Entity 3

$

 

 

          Entity 1-2

$

 

 

Entity …

$

 

 

          Entity 1 - …

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sub-Total 1

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Total

$

 

 

Group 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          Entity 2-1

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

          Entity 2-2

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

          Entity 2-…

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sub-Total 2

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          Entity …

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sub-Total …

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Total

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each entity is always presented individually, and will cover the complete construction cost of that entity OR description of that entity including the full extent of the identified client needs and requirements. However, as this cost presentation or report is necessarily all-inclusive the presentation may well include work that is:

 

1. paid from a distinct, identified, and separate funding source, or is to be;

2. attributed to one, or several, specific end goals inherent in the overall construction, or for; one reason or another;

3. the client wishes to see specifically  identified.

 

These ‘included’ costs or description are therefore, for want of a better term, ‘abstracted’ from the overall presentation. Using  precisely the same classification format for each ‘abstract’ provides a very clear picture of what is included, and where, in the overall entity.

 

Depending on a variety of specific project and client needs the approach to this identification of work in specific areas or needs can be approached in two main ways. Costing them separately and then aggregating them together (not to be confused with the aggregation of distinct constructed entities described earlier) to create the overall entity total, or costing the overall total for the entity and then abstracting them for separate identification. Which approach is applied will depend very much on the information available, the purpose of the presentation, and also, subjectively upon the cost planner’s preferred approach (usually the result of a quick decision on the simplest, least time consuming, and most direct approach in the circumstances!).